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  • Black-figured Hydria: A Chariot with Hector's Lifeless Body and Achilles. Shoulders: A Chariot and Warriors

    Dimensions:
    height: 49,0 cm

Black-figured Hydria: A Chariot with Hector's Lifeless Body and Achilles. Shoulders: A Chariot and Warriors

Created: Attica. 510s BC

Found:

Greek vase-painters working in the black-figure style - in which the image was applied in black lacquer against the background of the fired clay - often turned to subjects from Homer's great epics the Iliad and the Odyssey. On this hydria - a vessel with three handles for carrying water - the Attic painter depicted a scene from the Trojan war in which Achilles ties the body of the Trojan hero Hector, killed by him, to a chariot. He goes on to mock his enemy's body publicly by dragging it along the ground before the very walls of Troy. It is possible that the artist was inspired by some monumental work on the same subject, which would explain why the image does not seem to fit perfectly onto the more limited surface area of the vase. Particular attention is paid to the group with Achilles and Hector: Achilles's movement is quick, his pose natural while the master noted such details as the dead Hector's closed eyes and open mouth. He carefully worked up details, particularly weaponry (the emblems on the shields, the crest of Achilles's helmet decorated with a fox), using - in addition to the basic black lacquer in which the image is drawn on the fired clay - incised lines and red and white paint. The master sought not only a certain realism but also freedom from restraint: Achilles's leg and Hector's hand are flung beyond the ornamental frame, while we see only part of the horses. This, however, is in contravention of the strict principles of the black-figure style.

Title:

Black-figured Hydria: A Chariot with Hector's Lifeless Body and Achilles. Shoulders: A Chariot and Warriors

Place:

Date:

Material:

Dimensions:

height: 49,0 cm

Acquisition date:

Entered the Hermitage in 1834; formerly in the Pizzati collection

Inventory Number:

ГР-2003

Collection:

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