• Seascape

    Artist:
    Porcellis, Jan. 1584-1632
    Technique:
    oil
    Dimensions:
    47,5x63,5 cm

Porcellis, Jan. 1584-1632

Seascape

Holland, Circa 1630

Life in Holland was inseparably bound up with the sea and it was in this country that the seascape emerged as a distinct type of painting. The founder of this new genre was Jan Porcellis. This artist was interested only in the sea and regarded everything else – people and the shore, boats and ships – only in connection with it. This painting exudes a sense of cold from the overcast sky and agitated surface of the water. They are seen through the eyes of a man closely acquainted with the ways of the North Sea. The impression of the boundlessness and mobility of the watery expanse is heightened by the depiction of the heeling ships. Porcellis made a study of the types and rigging of seagoing vessels and always depicted them with documentary precision. Sky and water here are united by a silvery-grey tone that almost tangibly conveys the atmosphere saturated with moisture and light. The attention paid to the shifting states of the maritime element is a reminder of the constant struggle that the Dutch have waged since time immemorial to keep the lands that they won from the sea on which to live and farm. This age-old battle between people and nature shaped to a large extent the character of their highly practical perception of life and art. The representation in painting of the watery element was to be one of the most important discoveries of the Dutch school in the 17th century.

Title:

Seascape

Place:

Date:

Material:

Technique:

oil

Dimensions:

47,5x63,5 cm

Acquisition date:

Transferred in 1925 to the Hermitage from the Gatchina Palace

Inventory Number:

ГЭ-1017

Category:

Collection:

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