Web Content Viewer (JSR 286)

Actions
Loading...
  • Marsh

    Artist:
    Ruisdael, Jacob Isaaksz van. 1628 or 1629-1682
    Technique:
    oil
    Dimensions:
    72,5x99 cm

Ruisdael, Jacob Isaaksz van. 1628 or 1629-1682

Marsh

Holland, 1660s

Ruisdael was to become famous for his philosophical approach to nature, which he saw as a symbol of eternity. In this work he unfolds before the viewer a grandiose severe scene in which thick, powerful trees seek to balance their twisting trunks on small tussocks surrounded on all sides by swamp and marshes. Water, the source of life, here threatens to swallow everything in its quagmire. The young birch tree seems weak, the last strength of the dying beech is departing. And yet the burgeoning green leaves, the unusual force with which everything grows, forging its way upwards towards the light, gives hope. In the distance is the pure line of the horizon, towards which some lost traveller seems to be trudging in search of firm ground. In generalizing this majestic and tragic picture of existence, Ruisdael differentiates each detail and lingers on it, conveying the gentleness of the flowering water-lilies and the reflections of the trees in the water, capturing the fright of a bird as it flies upwards. The leaves are lit by the warm colours of autumn and the dark earthy-olive tones gradually dissolve in the light of the bluish distance. A philosopher artist, Ruisdael comprehended the essence of the laws of existence and created a new type of psychological landscape, opening the way for the late romantics.

Title:

Marsh

Place:

Date:

Material:

Technique:

oil

Dimensions:

72,5x99 cm

Acquisition date:

Entered the Hermitage between 1763 and 1773; formerly in the collection of Catherine the Great

Inventory Number:

ГЭ-934

Category:

Collection:

User collections including this work of art: