• Wine-Cooler

    Technique:
    forging, cast, chasing, engraving
    Dimensions:
    100х169х98 cm

Wine-Cooler

Great Britain, 1734-1735

A wine-cooler executed by Charles Kaendler is a unique work unequalled anywhere in the world. It was made at the initiative of the jeweler and banker Henry Jerningham for an English customer. The project was carried out by George Vertue, the figures were modelled by the sculptor Michael Risbrake, the silverwork was done by Charles Kaendler and his assistants. The wine-cooler took nearly four years to complete. Its length is 169 cm, its height is 98 cm and its weight is 220 kg. A huge bowl rests on the backs of four furious panthers. Its side walls are decorated in high relief with frolicking putti. Its massive handles are decorated with sculptures of a satyr and a bacchante, the companions of the god of wine, Bacchus. The rim of the cooler is entwined with a vine. The bright "sappy" bunches of grapes are interlaced with matted leaves. One can notice a silver snail, a fly and a caterpillar. Despite general admiration, nobody in England could buy such an expensive thing. Finally it was decided to use the wine-cooler as the main lottery prize. In 1737 the prize was won by William Battine, a landowner in Sussex. It is unclear how the cooler made its way to Russia. It is suggested that it could have been purchased for Empress Anna Ioannovna, since she took an interest in this thing through Antioch Kantemir, the Russian Ambassador in England. The fact that in 1881 a galvanocopy of the wine-cooler was made for the Victoria & Albert Museum in London testifies to its great artistic value. At present there is another galvanocopy on display in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.

Title:

Wine-Cooler

Place of creation:

Date:

School:

Material:

Technique:

forging, cast, chasing, engraving

Dimensions:

100х169х98 cm

Inventory Number:

Э-7041

Category:

Collection:

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