• Statuette "Sea Robin"

    Technique:
    polychrome underglaze painting
    Dimensions:
    9,2х17,8х21,2 cm

Statuette "Sea Robin"

Denmark, Copenhagen, 1902 (?)

Maritime fauna featured quite frequently among the porcelain animal sculptures produced by the Copenhagen factory in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The sculptors strove to make their depictions of fish as lifelike as possible and to show them in natural motion. In the Art Nouveau style of the period, particular attention was devoted to the silhouette, to the expressive outline that was no less important in sculpture than in painting or graphic art. The gurnard, also known as a sea robin, was a very suitable subject in that regard. This piece was created by one of the Danish royal factory’s finest sculptors, Erik Nielsen. He emphasized the most striking aspects of his model – the large head with bulging eyes and an open mouth, the attractive fins fanned out in different directions, and the slight bend of the tail that conveys the fish’s movement through the water. The underglaze painting is subtly restrained and produces a perfect illusion of wet scales.

Title:

Statuette "Sea Robin"

Place of creation:

Manufacture, workshop, firm:

Royal Copenhagen Manufactory

Date:

Material:

Technique:

polychrome underglaze painting

Dimensions:

9,2х17,8х21,2 cm

Acquisition date:

Entered the Hermitage in 2002; transferred as part of the collection of the Museum of the Imperial Porcelain Factory

Inventory Number:

Мз-З-980