• Red-figured Amphora: Hermes and Ganymede

    Dimensions:
    height: 47,2 cm

Red-figured Amphora: Hermes and Ganymede

Created: Attica. circa 470 BC

Found:

Amphora is a vessel with two handles for wine and oil. This example is decorated with an episode from the story of Ganymede, handsome son of the Trojan King Tros and the nymph Callirhoe. Ganymede was abducted by the supreme god, Zeus, who took him to Mount Olympus, where he became Zeus's cup-bearer and favourite. The Attic master here showed not Zeus, however, as would have been usual in such scenes, but Hermes, messenger of the gods. The boy Ganymede is playing with a hoop when he is caught unawares by Hermes and runs away in fright. His figure is childishly angular with elongated proportions, the very broad shoulders and slender waist recalling archaic statues, particularly in their typical conventional turn - head and legs in profile, eye and shoulders en face. The artist convincingly portrays the youth's fear as he turns his head towards his pursuer, running so fast that his feet do not touch the ground. But Hermes, despite his unhurried appearance, is already overtaking the boy and touches him on the shoulder. In this composition we see a combination of realistic details and elements of stylization in the figures, particularly in the treatment of the naked body and the folds of Hermes's cloak.

Title:

Red-figured Amphora: Hermes and Ganymede

Place:

Date:

Material:

Dimensions:

height: 47,2 cm

Acquisition date:

Entered the Hermitage in 1894; handed over from the Imperial Academy of Science

Inventory Number:

ГР-7028

Collection: